Author Topic: Hula...  (Read 3359 times)

Offline Tim Vargas

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Hula...
« on: May 01, 2014, 02:55:36 PM »
Just wondering how many instructors teach, or encourage the learning of hula to help with their students self-defense.

GGM Gaylord mentioned several times that knowing hula improves our Art, better being able to move, etc..   He also said that hula is pretty much the standard in Hawaii, but for us on the Mainland is something missing for most of us. 

I was thinking that it would be good to include in seminars the teaching of hula, since its seems to be a part of the roots of Kajukenbo that is usually overlooked and missing altogether.

Thanx.
Tim Vargas:  Chief Instructor directly under the late GGM Gaylord. OKO

Offline Dave Jones

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Re: Hula...
« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2014, 03:07:31 PM »
I have my students watch hula and then I smile when I see them recognize techniques movements but finding a hula teacher in St. Louis would be more trouble than it is worth.  ;-)
« Last Edit: May 01, 2014, 05:09:45 PM by Dave Jones »
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sgns1173

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Re: Hula...
« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2014, 04:37:09 PM »
Aloha,

Hula is a dance form accompanied by chant (oli) or song (mele). It was developed in the Hawaiian Islands by the Polynesians who originally settled there. The hula dramatizes or portrays the words of the oli or mele in a visual dance form.
There are many sub-styles of hula, with the main two categories being Hula 'Auana and Hula Kahiko. Ancient hula, as performed before Western encounters with Hawaii, is called kahiko. It is accompanied by chant and traditional instruments. Hula, as it evolved under Western influence in the 19th and 20th centuries, is called awana (a word that means "to wander" or "drift"). It is accompanied by song and Western-influenced musical instruments such as the guitar, the ukulele, and the double bass.
Terminology for two main additional categories is beginning to enter the hula lexicon: "Monarchy" includes any hula which were composed and choreographed during the 19th century. During that time the influx of Western culture created significant changes in the formal Hawaiian arts, including hula. "Ai Kahiko", meaning "in the ancient style" are those hula written in the 20th and 21st centuries that follow the stylistic protocols of the ancient hula kahiko.
There are also two main positions of a hula dance - either sitting (noho dance) or standing (luna dance). Some dances utilize both forms.
Hula is taught in schools or groups called halau. The teacher of hula is the kumu hula, where kumu means source of knowledge, or literally just teacher. Often there is a hierarchy in hula schools - starting with the kumu (teacher), alaka'i (leader), kokua (helpers), and then the 'olapa (dancers) or haumana (students). This is not true for every h?lau, but it does occur often. Most, if not all, hula halau(s) have a permission chant in order to enter wherever they may practice. They will collectively chant their entrance chant, then wait for the kumu to respond with the entrance chant, once he or she is finished, the students may enter. One well known and often used entrance or permission chant is Kunihi Ka Mauna/Tunihi Ta Mauna.
Hula dancing is a complex art form, and there are many hand motions used to represent the words in a song or chant. For example, hand movements can signify aspects of nature, such as the swaying of a tree in the breeze or a wave in the ocean, or a feeling or emotion, such as fondness or yearning. Foot and hip movements often pull from a basic library of steps including the kaholo, ka'o, kawelu, hela, 'uwehe, and 'ami.
There are other related dances (tamure, hura, 'aparima, 'ote'a, haka, kapa haka, poi, Fa'ataupati, Tau'olunga, and Lakalaka) that come from other Polynesian islands such as Tahiti, The Cook Islands, Samoa, Tonga and Aotearoa (New Zealand); however, the hula is unique to the Hawaiian Islands.

IMHO, "Hula" in some respects maybe beneficial in martial arts, it is not the roots of Kajukenbo. 

Mahalo,

Gerry Scott
 

   
« Last Edit: May 02, 2014, 12:19:27 AM by Kalihi/Palama Boy »

Offline Tim Vargas

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Re: Hula...
« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2014, 06:00:55 PM »
thank you GM Scott for the Wiki-grab...

I wonder how many of the Founders of Kajukenbo ever did hula?  Any idea?

Thanks
 
Tim Vargas:  Chief Instructor directly under the late GGM Gaylord. OKO

Offline Dave Jones

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Re: Hula...
« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2014, 10:27:23 PM »
Correct me if I am mistaken, but I surmised that "hula" was actually from the Lua techniques, or maybe the other way around.
The Lua was/is mostly embedded in DZR.
That would imply Co-Founders Shihan Holck and Uncle Frank were primarily the ones that might have "sort-of" learned hula

"Training methods include spear catching, training in the surf, and focus of "mana" or life force. This energy is described much like chi or ki in Chinese or Japanese martial arts. Exercises are used to focus this energy much like the exercise of chi kung"  --- Wikipedia

Since Lua was revived at the same time as Hula by King Kalahaua I always presumed they were somehow related.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2014, 10:33:38 PM by Dave Jones »
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Offline Tim Vargas

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Re: Hula...
« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2014, 11:44:21 PM »
That is an interesting connection in regards to Lua.

Although the hula is not considered a "root" of Kajukenbo, it seemed to play a small roll for some in the way they moved, similar to the roll boxing played, etc..  I believe the gist of what GGM Gaylord was speaking on is his experience the hula had for him, and expressed that it would be good for others, and probably any type of dance for that matter.  I know that Prof. Gabe Vargas was a very good dancer (Mainland kine), and probably still has the moves, and implemented that into our workouts, encouraging moving those feet and body!  ;D

I was just interested in seeing if any instructors, whether in the Islands or on the Mainland, use hula or any other type of dancing, or do they strictly take from fighting arts only? 

In my opinion, I like hula, because it breathes where Kajukenbo originates.

Tim Vargas:  Chief Instructor directly under the late GGM Gaylord. OKO

sgns1173

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Re: Hula...
« Reply #6 on: May 02, 2014, 12:08:14 AM »
Aloha,

King Kalakaua earned the nickname "the Merrie Monarch," because of his love of joyful elements of life. During his reign, hula was revived, after having been banned in 1830 by Queen Ka'ahumanu after she had converted to Christianity. Today, his name lives on in the Merrie Monarch Festival, a hula festival named in his honor. He is also known to have revived the Hawaiian martial art, Lua, and surfing.  He wrote Hawai’i Ponoi, which is the state song of Hawaii today. King Kalakaua's ardent support of the then newly introduced ukulele as a Hawaiian instrument led to its becoming symbolic of Hawaii and Hawaiian culture.  It was not the norm for men/boys to participate in hula during the era of the “Founders of Kajukenbo”.   Today men and women participate in Hula, but the women are overwhelmingly represented.  Hula is beneficial: improvement in footwork, balance, feet and hand coordination, relaxation, breathing, rotation of hips, and a strong foundation.  This is a fact because my wife and my three girls have done it.
Yes Sifu Tim, any type of dancing will improve your martial arts skills and Grandmaster Gaylord is correct.  Excellent topic....     

Mahalo,

Gerry Scott
« Last Edit: May 03, 2014, 04:50:50 AM by Kalihi/Palama Boy »

Offline GEORGE LIM

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Re: Hula...
« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2014, 01:39:50 PM »
Aloha,

Kajukenbo Arizona. Mesa. Gilbert.
Professor Kelly Corder & Sifu Jenn Corder
Hula Halau Kaju AZ.
Alaka'i/Sifu Dolly Abad

Lim's Hawaii Kenpo. Portugal. Europe
Professor Nuno Nunes
Hula Halau O' Nani
Kumu/Sifu Ana Nunes

LIM Karate. Hawaii Kenpo/Kajukenbo. Barneys Queen Creek AZ.
Sr. Professor Patrice Lim
Hula Halau Pili Hana.
Alaka'i Lillian Pambuan

80% of our Ladies & Gentlemen that dance the Art of Hula are also Kenpo & Kajukenbo practitioners & Teachers.
They also are taught Hawaiian culture.

Respectfully. Mahalo.
George & Patrice Lim
George Lim
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Grandmaster. Hawaii Kenpo, Kajukenbo

Offline GM ALAN M. REYES

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Re: Hula...
« Reply #8 on: May 21, 2014, 02:39:15 PM »
Tim
My mother, Kumu Hula Maria Reyes, was the teacher of the Tiare Dancers here in N. California, in the past Tony Ramos, my father Aleju Reyes,Joe Halbuna and Charles Gaylord did "hula" on stage at the many Luaus the KAA,IKA,KSDI participated in, it was fun to see them attempt to do what was in them!!! Hulas showed form, flow, and talking story, again fun for all. Myself I did Samoan Fire Knives at Harvey wagon wheel at Lake Tahoe, and the Masters Demo held at Disney World in Florida, defintely taught me flow, or get burned trying,,,,LOL!!! younger days for all, and great memories.
With all due respect
GMReyes
« Last Edit: May 21, 2014, 02:42:48 PM by GM ALAN M. REYES »
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Offline Tim Vargas

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Re: Hula...
« Reply #9 on: May 21, 2014, 04:09:58 PM »
sounds like some awesome times GM Reyes! Thanx for sharing.

Also tnx to GM's Scott and Lim and Signung for contributing to this thread...
Tim Vargas:  Chief Instructor directly under the late GGM Gaylord. OKO