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Thought for the day on kicks:

Author Topic: Thought for the day on kicks:  (Read 4187 times)

Offline c.chambers

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Thought for the day on kicks:
« on: September 20, 2011, 02:29:49 PM »
Kicks: After most of the general public finds out that I am a martial art instructor; they ussualy ask me how high I can kick or they want me to demonstrate some fancy kicks. Why? 1st let me say that I do believe that kicks are important, however, kicks are only a part of martial arts, ecpecially in Kajukembo and other practical martial arts. I am not known for being an outstanding kicker, but I am known for practical self defense. In saying this, I believe that alot of martial arts have spoiled the general public into believing that martial arts are all about kicking! They have missed the point. The word martial can be defined as military and military, as we all know, means combat. The word art can be defined as the human expression or personal expression of ones self. So martial art really means the expression of a persons combative spirit. There are numerouse aspects of the martial arts such as footwork (not kicking), take downs and take down defense, blocks, wrist locks, escapes from the ground and standing, grappling and my favorite; hands. The hands are so much more versatile than kicks that it has been said by many masters that it takes a life time to master the hands. I want to say again that kicks are very important in the martial arts, but they are only one tool in the martial artist tool box. I can pin point the martial art that has spoiled the public, however, before informing you of the art I want to say that all arts are useful and have their place in the martial arts community. So what art am I referring to? Tae Kwon Do. Again, their is nothing wrong with the art. The only thing wrong is that of the publics view of martial arts due to the popularity of Tae Kwon Do. In fact I give great credit to Tae Kwon Do in that they are so popular and have reached millions of the general public to reap the positive benafits of the martial arts. I am just simply pointing out that their is more to martial arts than just kicks. I truly believe that if you want to be the best self defense practitioner then you need to find an art that teaches a well rounded system of combat. Like Kajukembo.

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Sigung Curtis Chambers. 6th degree blackbelt , American Kajukembo Asossiation member &  student of Professor James Cox.Head instructor in Texarkana Tx. Started Kajukembo "the Knight method" in 2006.

Offline Gints Klimanis

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Re: Thought for the day on kicks:
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2011, 08:15:13 PM »
"In saying this, I believe that alot of martial arts have spoiled the general public into believing that martial arts are all about kicking! They have missed the point."

Correct.  But most parents are just looking for an interesting version of gymnastics for their kids with zero chance of injury or a "shiner" before Christmas.  "Paul Mitchell" martial arts appeals to the tastes of mainstream America and the mainstream of just about every other nation.

"n fact I give great credit to Tae Kwon Do in that they are so popular and have reached millions of the general public to reap the positive benafits of the martial arts."

Why?  They do this with a program that is largely performance art.  If you want their success, go that route.
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Offline Patrick Campbell

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Re: Thought for the day on kicks:
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2011, 11:01:04 PM »
So in talking about the flashy kicks - this is one thing - however there are those kicks that aren't even mainstream Kajukenbo conventional kicks that are quite useful in close combat. The basic kicks can be perfected in use as well. It depends on the artist. Many of the Sin Moo Hapkido kicks are very functional - below the waist kicks. I personally use a handful of very effective and devastating kicks that are all below the waist and I have trained them to perfection  as far as using them with harsh effect. Some of them I learned from Hapkido and the others are of the Kuntau variety . On a final note. Steps should be kicks and kicks should be steps. Kicks must come off the natural stepping motion of the feet in order to be invisible and effective. The same could be said of striking as well  in order to be unseen the strike should come off the natural movement of the body. Sort of a tangent but my two cents. Much can be written on "invisible striking."

Pat
Patrick "Kaponookalani" Campbell, Ph.D.
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Offline guarded

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Re: Thought for the day on kicks:
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2011, 12:59:59 AM »
I love the "invisible" concept.  In Kajukenbo there are very few kicks that aren't sequenced with another technique, especially in the initial stages of a self defense sequence.  When someone "comes to" after trying to assault a Kajukenbo specialist, ask him/her if they can recall "what the hell happened" and in what order.  Not only are our techniques designed to be part of our natural body movements but they are almost never going to happen one at a time.  So they may not be literally invisible, but they sure wont see it coming.
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Offline Ron Baker

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Re: Thought for the day on kicks:
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2011, 07:08:16 AM »
Quote
In fact I give great credit to Tae Kwon Do in that they are so popular and have reached millions of the general public to reap the positive benafits of the martial arts. I am just simply pointing out that their is more to martial arts than just kicks. I truly believe that if you want to be the best self defense practitioner then you need to find an art that teaches a well rounded system of combat. Like Kajukembo.

I'll give them credit for creating a pretty decent business model as it relates to children's programs.  But beyond the clever revenue-generating schemes, it has become an empty art, in my opinion.  It didn't use to be that way.
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Offline Patrick Campbell

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Re: Thought for the day on kicks:
« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2011, 04:11:58 PM »
I love the "invisible" concept.  In Kajukenbo there are very few kicks that aren't sequenced with another technique, especially in the initial stages of a self defense sequence.  When someone "comes to" after trying to assault a Kajukenbo specialist, ask him/her if they can recall "what the hell happened" and in what order.  Not only are our techniques designed to be part of our natural body movements but they are almost never going to happen one at a time.  So they may not be literally invisible, but they sure wont see it coming.

Indeed any stance is a fighting stance. No matter how fast we think we are if the opponent sees it coming it's not fast enough - unless he just can't move out of the way. On the same vein any move we make can be a fighting move as in attack and defense. The move is the hit or kick and the technique is actually the follow thru. The most well thought out and executed technique at the wrong time will likely fail whereas the most natural not so pretty and thoughtless technique executed at the right time will usually do the trick. I use a simple formula to relate the attack:  

SUPRISE X SPEED X ACCURACY = SHOCK

Much can be discussed concerning each part of this formula and how it relates to street-fighting as well as tournament fighting as well as mma as well as so on and so on....


Pat
« Last Edit: October 10, 2011, 04:19:16 PM by Patrick Campbell »
Patrick "Kaponookalani" Campbell, Ph.D.
KAJUKENBO - Professor Kai Li - ETS / HKA
Kenpo - SGM Rick Alemany 
DZR Jujitsu - ETS / AJI
BJJ - ETS / USFBJJ / Master Joe Moreira
Combat Sambo - ETS / GCA / GM Alan New 
JKD / Kun Tao - ETS / IMB / G. Savelli
Royal Hawaiian Lua - ETS PA / Olohe Eli

Offline c.chambers

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Re: Thought for the day on kicks:
« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2011, 10:44:50 PM »
Thank you for your replies.
Sigung Curtis Chambers. 6th degree blackbelt , American Kajukembo Asossiation member &  student of Professor James Cox.Head instructor in Texarkana Tx. Started Kajukembo "the Knight method" in 2006.