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Music or No Music for Tai Chi

Author Topic: Music or No Music for Tai Chi  (Read 9921 times)

Offline Mitch Powell

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Music or No Music for Tai Chi
« on: December 12, 2003, 02:45:43 PM »
I have trained with teachers who use music when practicing Tai Chi and Chi Kung, and those that don't. Which do you prefer and why?
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Offline Jess

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Re:Music or No Music for Tai Chi
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2003, 05:39:04 PM »
I've used both way in my classes.
I use music because it helps to add a relaxed mood to the class.
However there are times that you need t be able to see if relaxation can be gained with normal back ground noise going on.
We cna't always carry a radio around with us
Sifu Lauren Jessup,

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Offline got_kenpo?

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Re:Music or No Music for Tai Chi
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2003, 07:20:09 PM »
I remember doing a "Fragrant Chi Kung" that used a tape that called out excercises.Between excercises there was music. It helped to keep an even amount of time for each excercise. In all the tape was about 15-20 min.long.............now I need to find the tape. ;D
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Offline D-Man

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Re:Music or No Music for Tai Chi
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2003, 05:02:05 AM »
Training with music is something that I believe we should try to move away from as we become stronger in the internal component of martial arts.  For one, music is a source of external motivation which is detrimental in the internal arts, and even in the "external" arts.  If we can motivate ourselves from within, we will no longer depend on a favorable environment or situation to motivate us so that we may excel and prevale in combat or life's little games.  Also, listening to music helps pass the time nicely and relax your mind, but it also makes it difficult to perform one of the most important tasks in the internal arts; listening to your body so that you may correct it's mistakes and improve on it's strengths.  The first step to improvement is mindfulness of the oppertunity to do so, and if we do not focuss every last drop of our attention on the area that we are working on, then we are not practicing at our full potential.

Having said that, have you ever waited in one of the standing post positions for half an hour with no music?  Do you have any idea how incredibly boring standing there in silence with nothing to occupy your mind around is?  How about an hour?  Would beginners feel the same, class after class with no external motivation?  I don't think I am a srong enough person to train in an art as boring as Tai Chi (yes, I said it, sometimes it can be very BORING!) with no music, but I hope to be soon.

So, in reallity, music is like a nicotine patch.  It is an unhealthy way of leading ourselves in a healthy direction.  While the idea of introducing nicotine (music) to our body is bad, using it untill we no longer need it, in order to break that dependency, is a good thing.  

I think I'll stop now before I really loose everyone.  :)

Offline badsifu

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Re:Music or No Music for Tai Chi
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2003, 10:52:04 AM »
Not supposed to use music.  If it helps you relax and do the form correctly though...
Dan Tyrrell

Offline Jess

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Re:Music or No Music for Tai Chi
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2003, 02:18:44 PM »
  Music can be a tool to aid you, as long as you don't become dependent on it. Cultures have always used sound to aid them in meeting there goals from meditation to healing.
  As many peolpe come to Tai Chi for it's health benifits then music will help them in this.
  Training tools are like shoes, one size does not fit all.
  As for Tai Chi being boring, my wife says it's like standing still only alittle faster.
 
Sifu Lauren Jessup,

Northern Tum Pai Tai Chi Ch'uan
Under GM Jay Burkey

Offline Mell

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Re:Music or No Music for Tai Chi
« Reply #6 on: December 29, 2003, 09:02:59 PM »
I like music when working at home.  It helps me remember to breath (I think it is helpful to those of us who are new at this).
Sibak Mellody Porter
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Offline BB54

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Re:Music or No Music for Tai Chi
« Reply #7 on: January 06, 2004, 08:35:39 AM »
Music for Practicing Tai Chi Chuan

Actually I have found that the best music for Tai Chi Chuan is sounds of nature.  There are several CD's out there.  "Songs of Nature" is song birds.  "Sounds of Nature" is wind blowing, the tide coming in, waterfalls etc.  The non human sounds.  This will help you empty your mind almost like meditation. This will help you to relax mentally and blend with nature.

The flavoring of the sounds is different for each of the systems.  For instance Hsing-I Chuan is the "hard" of the internal systems, I suggest using sounds of a storm i.e. thunder and lightening. Tai Chi Chuan, I suggest the sounds of waves crashing against the shore.  Ba Qua Chang use the sounds of a water running in a river, waterfall. Something flowing.

Not to loud and not too soft just enough to be in the background to get rid of the "Brain Roof Chatter" going on in your head.

I really prefer song birds.  It just takes away the stress thing and I can still practice without distraction or losing concentration.  What you think, is to move the chi around in a combat fashion.  Each sequence of movement has Martial Arts applications.  After practicing the combat mental intent for awhile you can just turn the mind off to think of nothing, blending with "nature".  But at first you must be the warrior.  If you do not, Tai Chi Chuan or any of the internal arts becomes "Ballet".
Brian Bruce Baxter. 8th Degree Black Belt Kajukenbo (Gaylord Method).  3rd Degree Black Belt Tracy's Kenpo Karate. 3rd Degree Black Belt Aikijitsu. 2nd Degree Black Belt Mu Duk Kwan.  22 years experience Yang Tai Chi Chuan.

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Re:Music or No Music for Tai Chi
« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2004, 02:01:20 AM »
There is no right or wrong. If music helps, then use it. However, specific type of music can be more of a benefit. Music that provides continuance flow...mind, body and spirit...I find Carlos Nakai, a Native American Flutist - "Canyon Trilogy", to be a good one. His music provides the vehicle...to flow with the flow...enjoy..and .. just have fun with it..
Professor Ron Lew

Offline Humble Student

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Re:Music or No Music for Tai Chi
« Reply #9 on: April 11, 2004, 12:11:19 AM »
Though new to the world of Tai Chi, it seems to me that the art demands the ability to blend with or detach from whatever rhythm is present around you...whether it be music, street noise, birds, rain, or silence.  I appreciate the variation.

Thanks for a great class this morning, Sigung Pat...

Respectfully-
Mike Johnson  
Guangxi School of Martial Arts          
Napa, California

Offline guarded

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Re:Music or No Music for Tai Chi
« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2004, 06:30:42 AM »
Our ancestors have used music for thousands of years to aid them in their spiritual journeys.
Jerry Guard
Kajukenbo Tum Pai Brown/Black Sash under Prof. Steve Larson          My everyday stance is my fighting stance.  My fighting stance is my everyday stance.

Offline kajugolfer

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Re:Music or No Music for Tai Chi
« Reply #11 on: April 28, 2004, 06:50:18 PM »
Yes I use Kenny G in the mainland and now I use Hawaiian music since I move to Hawaii. And I thank Sigung Tyrrell for introducing me taichi. I think it's awesome to have spirit, mind and body plus music. You guys should try it really bring out of what you are and what you can be.

Mahalo,
Sigung Jay
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Offline Mark Dinkel

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Re: Music or No Music for Tai Chi
« Reply #12 on: December 23, 2005, 05:10:50 PM »
I've done ba gua to the blues and ethnic genre like african drums and tai qi and qi gung to music designed specifically for them. I found if the music is familiar to me, it sometimes helps me and other times distracts me. If the music is unfamiliar to me, it more often than not prevents me from maintaining the internal connections and harmony except the music specifically designed for tai qi and qi gong. For any of the arts that I have studied (all internal arts and Kajukenbo) if the music is too loud or fast it can really prevent me from sinking into the places I need to go. The music specifically designed for tai qi and qi gung is often slower paced filled with mellow gongs and flutes and sounds of nature. This type of music when it works helps me to get down deep when I otherwise might not be able to because of all the other stuff going on in my mind. The music makes it so I do not have to spend an hour just to get into the right frame of mind. WIth the music, I can get into the necessary frame of mind usually within 15-20 minutes. However, if I am already relaxed and ready to train and I really want to get into myself and the forms, the more silent the better.

With respect to DMan's comments, yeah standing in a horse stance for an hour can be quite difficult mentally, but is that not part of the training. In my first Kajukenbo school, all classes started with at least 20-30 minute horse stances. As we progressed it became more like 45-60 minute horse stances. I cannot tell you how many times I wanted a television, book or some other mentally occupying media in front of me.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2005, 05:14:37 PM by Mark Dinkel »
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Offline John Magee

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Re:Music or No Music for Tai Chi
« Reply #13 on: December 23, 2005, 09:15:36 PM »
Yes I use Kenny G in the mainland

Kenny G... *shudder*

 ;D

LOYALONEHK

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Re: Music or No Music for Tai Chi
« Reply #14 on: September 22, 2006, 12:00:15 PM »
I either listen to relaxing music or the sounds of nature.  It helps me to not try and force QI.  I once read a good analogy of Qi.  "Qi is like a shy girl.  The moment you see (feel) her (Qi), she quickly hides.  Then when you look for her (Qi) it cannot be found.  Once you stop looking she (Qi) will all of a sudden be felt again sneeking up on you."  I like music because it takes my mind off of searching and I become more "sung"/relaxed.  Everything then seems to come together.

Thats just my 2 cents.
Dean

*But depending on my intent, I sometimes like to do the faster small san sau to metallica!  8)