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How Do You Market Kajukenbo?

Author Topic: How Do You Market Kajukenbo?  (Read 15640 times)

Offline kajudru

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How Do You Market Kajukenbo?
« on: October 13, 2009, 11:55:12 PM »
All,

We are a very small group (less then 5 and only one or are very dedicated). I was talking to the Judo instructor today and saying I feel the problem we have building the Kaju student base is that the MMA type does not want to train with us because we still have some traditional stuff (katas, tai chi, mediating) and TMA people do not want to train with us because we hit hard including being punched in the face during sparring (although our one rule is to never use knockout power during sparring).

We do not teach children (which I know brings in many adults). It would be nice to have 3 dedicated students, but we are not going to waterdown the curriculum to bring in more students or cut out the traditional stuff because it is seen as uncool right now during this MMA phase.

Please provide your thoughts on this subject.
Sihing Jason Drury
KSDI Student under Sifu Bill Ross (Tony Lasit Branch)
Elite Combat Academy
http://www.shreveportmartialarts.com/
Shreveport, LA

"More Sweat In Training, Less Blood In Battle"

Offline Patrick Campbell

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Re: How Do You Market Kajukenbo?
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2009, 12:47:00 AM »
If you are trying to make a living as a KAJUKENBO Instructor, one thing I would suggest is that you start teaching kids and build a solid base from there.The adults will come. I wouldn't quit my day job though if I were you.

I would also suggest checking out other KAJU web sites and visiting other schools that are successful at what they do. What are they doing that makes them effective? See what others among us are doing that makes them successful at attracting and maintaining students and running successful Kajukenbo schools. You have to attract students and you then need to keep them although a large percentage will fall by the wayside you should have a steady stream of new comers.  It takes students to get students. E.g other friends and family members.

You may also consider diversifying your efforts if you have diverse skills sets. For example, you may offer women's awareness and self defense courses/seminars at various gyms, etc... as well as children's self defense and fitness programs at places like the YMCA etc... If your skills sets are diverse enough you can offer other courses for specific groups such as law enforcement and military e.g. close quarter combatives , edged weapons defense, knife fighting, weapons retention, etc... These "extras" get your name and reputation out there and invariably lead to people asking if you can teach their children or if they can learn KAJUKENBO. 

Visiting other KAJUKENBO schools and getting their Chief Instructor to share his/her formula for success is a great way to generate some ideas on what you can do to get the ball rolling in your neck of the woods.

IMHO

Pat
Patrick "Kaponookalani" Campbell, Ph.D.
KAJUKENBO - Professor Kai Li - ETS / HKA
Kenpo - SGM Rick Alemany 
DZR Jujitsu - ETS / AJI
BJJ - ETS / USFBJJ / Master Joe Moreira
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Offline Ron Baker

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Re: How Do You Market Kajukenbo?
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2009, 08:52:48 AM »
All,

We are a very small group (less then 5 and only one or are very dedicated). I was talking to the Judo instructor today and saying I feel the problem we have building the Kaju student base is that the MMA type does not want to train with us because we still have some traditional stuff (katas, tai chi, mediating) and TMA people do not want to train with us because we hit hard including being punched in the face during sparring (although our one rule is to never use knockout power during sparring).

We do not teach children (which I know brings in many adults). It would be nice to have 3 dedicated students, but we are not going to waterdown the curriculum to bring in more students or cut out the traditional stuff because it is seen as uncool right now during this MMA phase.

Please provide your thoughts on this subject.

Aloha Sihing Jason:

You ask a very interesting question.  There are conflicting schools of thought on "marketing" Kajukenbo.  Some don't agree with marketing Kajukenbo (some reasons are valid, but many are not).  Others do believe in marketing Kajukenbo.  Most are responsible with their marketing, but some are irresponsible.  Personally, I see nothing wrong with marketing our art so long as you there's full disclosure of what Kajukenbo is and isn't.

That said, you're in a somewhat challenged position because you're wanting to market Kajukenbo while being partnered with arts that might contrast with it as much as they might compliment it.  But ... you do want to market, and you should adopt a few basic strategies.  (1) Get yourself some flyers -- use an approved logo and add something like "Introductory Special: $35, Includes Uniform and 30-Days' Lessons".  You can make these yourself and have someone print about 50 of them.  Put up a few at work; at Publix or Kroger or whatever grocery store you have.  If you only want a couple of students, this is a low-cost way of doing so.  (2) Know your Kaju history and present-day facts, and be prepared to articulate the nuances between the Judo, the MMA and the traditional Kajukenbo.  (3) Make some business cards.  You can buy the business card stock at Office Depot or Staples, etc.  Go online and find a "business card template" and then play around with making your cards.  A simple logo, your name and contact info is all you need.  Biz cards aren't a substitute for brochures or flyers, but the are effective means of contact.

Then do what Sifu Pat suggests.  Check out other Kaju websites.  There are lots out there.  And if you can, visit successful martial arts school in your area.  Not so that you can be like them, but to get an idea of what they do that might work for you.
 
Sigung (Shihan) Ron Baker
Kajukenbo 5280 MMA Foundation
Under GM Jason Groff
Ordonez Kajukenbo Ohana

Offline grand master hemenes

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Re: How Do You Market Kajukenbo?
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2009, 12:44:37 PM »
thats funny you brought this up one of my old student went to another schools after i retierd and his was learning kajukenbo and now the teacher stoped and all he wants to teach is mma well thats fine but he should have one day set aside for that and the others teaching kajukenbo. you have to have a base katas punching attacks grab arts ect. thats whats make you a good black belt and if you add mma to that thats ok to but you need the base first. i understand why more money for the school becouse its the new thing but you can teach both. i had my school for almost 30 years at my peak i had a little over 400 students i made a good living back then but i stayed with the same classes monday tuesday forms ect, wednesday and thursday sparing friday open night saturdays one of my black belts tought it was up to him. i stayed that way for almost thirty years. but number one you have to have a kids class or you will never make it. my kids class had around 40 to 60 kids in it and i had two classes a night but i was lucky i had 3 to 4 black belts helping me so it made it easy.
if you need help you call me i will tell you how you can get 40 plus new students a month every month it worked for me for 30 years no scams and you dont have to sell yourself out like most schools do now. 925 584 5441


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Offline kajudru

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Re: How Do You Market Kajukenbo?
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2009, 02:49:02 PM »
All,

Thank you very much for the responses and great advice, especially Prof. Hemenes for offering to personally help us. I am about to go on an extended vacation and do some of the things you suggest as well as give Prof. Hemenes a call.

Thanks again,
Jason

P.S. I am not trying to make a living out of this and unfortunately at this time I am unable to teach children (as a result I know we will never have a large adult class, but we also pay very little in rent).
Sihing Jason Drury
KSDI Student under Sifu Bill Ross (Tony Lasit Branch)
Elite Combat Academy
http://www.shreveportmartialarts.com/
Shreveport, LA

"More Sweat In Training, Less Blood In Battle"

Offline Jason Goldsmith

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Re: How Do You Market Kajukenbo?
« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2009, 02:59:23 PM »
Sihing Jason,

So you know, it is very possible to have a large adult class without teaching students.  In fact, I believe many instructors here are in such a position.
Sifu Jason Goldsmith
5th Degree, Wun Hop Kuen Do Kung Fu
Under GM Al Dacascos
Instructor--WHKD
Durham NC and Philadelphia PA
www.tkfmma.com

Offline Ghost Rider

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Re: How Do You Market Kajukenbo?
« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2009, 10:41:11 AM »
 8)
Jason the kajupit here in the California central valley has just under 100 students (97)
Children only account for 10 of them.
Your adult program can be stronger than your children’s program.
Another Grandmaster that we all know, told me that he has around 200 students at his gym and only 2 % of them are in the Kajukenbo class.
Most people are afraid of true Kajukenbo or just don’t want to be hit.
So if you offer different programs you can get more of the people that don’t want to be beat on to stay around.

I offer 4 programs

1- Kajukenbo (destroy your enemy and all his friends, look around for someone else)

2- Kajupit fit (martial art fitness)

3- MMA (all things martial arts, OPEN concepts of hard & soft style fighting, Judo, Jujitsu & grappling)
Not just cage fighting

4- Boxing

Some people think this is selling out, it’s not Kajukenbo.
I don’t agree, look at the break down.
I think it is a matter of teaching what you love as well as expanding your own knowledge and being able to keep your school open.
Children are only the future of Kajukenbo if they keep training as adults.

I was fortunate enough to be very close to our Sijo and I asked his advice many times.
Sijo always said be creative, he never said do it this way and this way only.
Sijo loved what I do, and told me many times that I was a very good instructor and he was proud of me.
If the top man in Kajukenbo said that, then that’s all I need.
So this is my advice to you, be creative, just don’t forget your roots.
  
It’s not just about marketing.
That’s how you get them to come, not how you get them to stay.

Greg Harper
« Last Edit: October 16, 2009, 10:45:28 AM by Ghost Rider »
Greg Harper
senior instructor, Gumataotao Kajukenbo
Head instructor, Kajupit MMA
Sijo Emperado's personal body guard

Offline Patrick Campbell

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Re: How Do You Market Kajukenbo?
« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2009, 10:53:31 AM »
8)
 
1- Kajukenbo (destroy your enemy and all his friends, look around for someone else)

 

That's what I'm talking about!

Pat
Patrick "Kaponookalani" Campbell, Ph.D.
KAJUKENBO - Professor Kai Li - ETS / HKA
Kenpo - SGM Rick Alemany 
DZR Jujitsu - ETS / AJI
BJJ - ETS / USFBJJ / Master Joe Moreira
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Offline grand master hemenes

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Re: How Do You Market Kajukenbo?
« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2009, 11:43:12 AM »
mr harper could you explane your version of the word selling out.

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Offline Ghost Rider

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Re: How Do You Market Kajukenbo?
« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2009, 01:26:27 PM »
to me it’s not selling out, but I guess maybe that could be too strong of a statement.
What I should have said is like this.
I ride a Harley
And some of those I ride with have different attitudes about the kind of Harley you ride.
Some are in to custom, some are in to Bad Boy, some are in to tradition and some are in to classics.
They are all from the Harley Davidson heritage.
Now that being said there are those that will say that’s not a Harley
THIS IS A HARLEY.
And unless you go back to at least the tradition level, all you have is two opinions.
Each with there own end result.
Have you ever found it funny that most of the tough guys in school that refuse to bow down or adapt grew up working for the good student who kept expanding his knowledge.
Just my opinion or maybe the story of my life LOL

I have friends that will say that’s not a Harley
I have friends that will say that’s not Kajukenbo
I wish I had spent more time in the books.

That being said,
I am proud of my Harley
I am proud of my KAJUKENBO
I try to expand my fighting knowledge every day of training


I hope that makes sense
mr. harper
« Last Edit: October 16, 2009, 01:30:13 PM by Ghost Rider »
Greg Harper
senior instructor, Gumataotao Kajukenbo
Head instructor, Kajupit MMA
Sijo Emperado's personal body guard

Offline grand master hemenes

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Re: How Do You Market Kajukenbo?
« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2009, 02:20:56 PM »
i almost bought a new harley road king this year but at the last minute i chickened out! i wanted it but i would not ride it alot and it would just be sitting in the garage.

i understand what your saying selling out to me is when they put kajukenbo aside and teach something thats in just to make more money theres nothing wrong with learning something new but you always must
keep to your main art that you know and just add to it. and then theres the schools that test 20 to 30 students every friday at 50.00 a pop even if there ready or not just so they can make an extra 1k for the week. i had a black belt from another school ask me how much did i charge for belt testing and remember i had 400 students plus at the time and i told him nothing he said omg you should be making an extra 8k a month and i told him ya but there not ready to test he said so just think an extra 8k month and i told him i could but then i could not sleep at night and thats not what kajukenbo is all abought in the old days you earned your belt with blood and sweat it was never just given to you. so the schools that do that are the ones selling out just for the money. and theres just to many out there right now. sad!


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p.s mybe one day i will get a moped! ( just kidding)
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Offline sifutimg

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Re: How Do You Market Kajukenbo?
« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2009, 04:13:06 PM »
GM Harper you are not selling out at all.  In my opinion (mine no one else's now), most of us know what Kajukenbo is supposed to represent - Hard realistic training that involves pain (love).  One of my favorite quotes that I heard from you sir is that "We don't hit you because we want to hurt you, we hit you because we love you" (hope I got that close GM Harper).  There is a mindset that is in place in regards to our training, there are black eyes and bloody noses, bruises and contusions.  That should never change in whatever you bring into your expression.  I know I wasn't being asked but my definition of selling out is when someone takes that mindset and our training methods and waters it down and THEN calls it Kajukenbo.  Sure there are adjustments as some people don't want to get hit or endure this type of training.  Well OK they can go somewhere else then right?  Or you can create beginning classes or a different category of classes that feed Kajukenbo classes but voice and example what will be expected of what is to come if they sign up for those classes. 

I think marketing Kajukenbo can be done but differentiation needs to be established as to what is what.  Create and arrange classes accordingly, have diverse programs and class schedule, those other programs are needed to bring in dollars because after all you are making your teaching your livelihood.  Have your other programs and have a staff to help teach those other programs.  What I see that has been a problem is it's difficult for one person to monitor 200+ people's growth to make sure they meet Kajukenbo standards.  Make the Kajukenbo class hold so many people and make it a real privilege for someone to be accepted into that class.  Some people need to have their buttons pushed and an instructor needs to be able to monitor that closely for liability reasons and the like. 

I really like GM Harper's Kajukenbo class name "destroy your enemy and all his friends, look around for someone else.  In 1984 we had Sijo here in the Portland area for a big seminar we had at our school.  We had over 300 people there.  Sijo was walking around and hitting people and it was great to see.  So echo GM Harper - After that seminar myself and several others went to downtown Portland and had dinner and I remember Sijo telling us to never stop being creative and learning other things and when you bring it back make it Kajukenbo!  Will never forget that. 

My 2-cents,
Tim
Professor Tim Gagnier
Student of Great Grandmaster Charles Gaylord & Grandmaster Sid Lopez
Chief Instructor Pacific Wind Kajukenbo
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Yamhill, Oregon

Offline Patrick Campbell

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Re: How Do You Market Kajukenbo?
« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2009, 04:43:54 PM »
I remember Sijo telling us to never stop being creative and learning other things and when you bring it back make it Kajukenbo!  Will never forget that. 
 

This diversity is everything in the life of an instructor. I have spent a lifetime (over 35 years actively learning and training) and will spend the rest of my life learning and teaching. Diversity is everything and it does not impact negatively on KAJUKENBO IMHO unless the roots are ignored. To me "selling out" is not being creative. What is art if it is simply something that is reproduced over and over again? And the serious study of KAJUKENBO means understanding this body of knowledge that exists, developing true skill and contributing to that body of knowledge. This is useful for all involved and beneficial to the art as we know it.

I teach the "original method" as a foundation as it is an imperative in my opinion for any serious student of KAJUKENBO. The key here is "serious student." I will not waste my time teaching KAJUKENBO if I initailly believe the prospective student does not understand the undertaking they are getting into and will not put in the time and effort needed. This would be "selling out" in my opinion because I refuse to water anything down. But it is only a foundation on which to build and grow. It is only a starting point for a journey that lasts a lifetime. Most of the people up to this point in my lifetime due to my military service, etc... have learned "other things" from me besides KAJUKENBO. My diversity has allowed me to do this and I like GM Harper do not consider this a "sell out." KAJUKENBO is what has allowed me to think and act this way.

Pat
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KAJUKENBO - Professor Kai Li - ETS / HKA
Kenpo - SGM Rick Alemany 
DZR Jujitsu - ETS / AJI
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Offline grand master hemenes

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Re: How Do You Market Kajukenbo?
« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2009, 05:56:29 PM »
tim i never said prof. harper was selling out i just asked what his defination of selling out was. for his opinion . on another note ive been under grand master gaylord for thiry years i dont remember ever seeing you how long have you been under him? did you ever trian with him?


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« Last Edit: October 16, 2009, 06:06:03 PM by prof.hemenes »
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Offline Greg Hoyt

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Re: How Do You Market Kajukenbo?
« Reply #14 on: October 17, 2009, 10:22:39 AM »
I don't know much about the marketing end of Kajukenbo, but I'm beginning to learn some.  I believe that most new students come from word of mouth. 
We're pretty up front when a new student shows up.  Bump, bruises, blood on the mat, hard training, good fun, and a caring atmosphere to train in.  We also carry that attitude outside of class.  Get togethers for UFC fights, whateva.  We have a open door policy, someone like train.....step on the mat. 
We try to point out that Kajukenbo is not about becoming a bad asp, it is not about learning how to kick asp.  It is about surviving the street confrontation, it is about defending our lives and the lives of our ohana.  Sometimes it is about defending the life of someone we don't even know. 
The pain and blood part of the training is what I believe sets Kajukenbo apart from most other arts.  As has already been mentioned, we don't train to inflict pain of each other.  We train hard so that we can COME TO BELIEVE that we can continue to fight even though we have been hurt. 
That's the was my instructor teaches, and that's more than good enough for me. 
Time for class.......Aloha

Greg
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