Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/kajukenb/public_html/cafe/Sources/Load.php(183) : runtime-created function on line 3
The Business of Kajukenbo

Author Topic: The Business of Kajukenbo  (Read 6680 times)

Offline Ron Baker

  • BlackBelt
  • Brown Belt
  • ****
  • Posts: 637
The Business of Kajukenbo
« on: July 24, 2009, 11:54:24 AM »
Any and all of us know and believe that Kajukenbo is a superior art.  What was once considered a backyard experiment, now has the capability to be a success in the marketplace.  Certainly we've got to be extremely careful not to over-commercialize and become McDojo's, but based on the long-term success of many of our school owners, we know that it's possible to be commercially successful while honoring the integrity of Kaju.

I'm no Wall Street guru, but working for the corporate world has helped to recognize a good business model when I see one.  Right now, the economy is soft and flabby; but when the economy becomes strong again, those good business models will still be needed (and appreciated).

Whether it's helping existing schools grow, or expanding our presence and encouraging start-ups in new areas of the country, please consider sharing your good business ideas.

Mahalo.

Ron Baker

 

 
Sigung (Shihan) Ron Baker
Kajukenbo 5280 MMA Foundation
Under GM Jason Groff
Ordonez Kajukenbo Ohana

Offline Danjo

  • BlackBelt
  • Brown Belt
  • ****
  • Posts: 881
  • Kajukenbo Forever!
Re: The Business of Kajukenbo
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2009, 12:38:15 PM »
The problem with a business model is that, once implemented, you become a servant of the model, rather than the art. It's aslippery slope when making money comes first. Everyone has always known that you could make money from Kajukenbo if you were willing to commercialize it the way other arts have done. It would work at first, then, as the need to perpetuate the money making machine became a reality, you'd have something no different than those other arts in terms of quality.

If someone opens a school in a good location and they do well finacially, then I'm very pleased to hear this, but that's different than having some expansion model that will eventually lead to a watered down system in order to retain students. The very need to keep your schools open will drive you to compromise.

Even gracie Jiujitsu has gone this route according the Helio Gracie. He hated that over half of his curriculum (all the self defense tricks that were supposed to be taught first) were usually left out of the schools he visited in favor of the strictly sport grappling part of it. He saw his system watered down for the sake of catering to the masses for money. He also hated that black belts were being given out on an average of five years when he had always said that ten years was the average to get to black belt in his art. He would even wear a blue belt to try to shame people saying "I'm only a blue belt, so how can the rest of you be black belts?" (It didn't work obviously).
"Rank Without Honor is Nothing."
Dan Weston
3rd Degree Black Belt under Prof. Bishop
FMAA
Don't tell me how much you honor Sijo, if you don't respect his wishes.

Offline Patrick Campbell

  • Sifu
  • BlackBelt
  • Brown Belt
  • ****
  • Posts: 694
  • Train the way you fight!
Re: The Business of Kajukenbo
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2009, 01:56:31 PM »

but based on the long-term success of many of our school owners, we know that it's possible to be commercially successful while honoring the integrity of Kaju.
 

Not everyone out there, including those who are commercially successful have as a goal commercial success. As far as I am concerned, it's not about commerciality - it's about teaching those who are willing to put in the blood, sweat and sometimes tears. Commercial success should be a mere by product of learning and teaching KAJU. I am sure that many of those who are commercially as successful as they are never dreamed that their back yard endeavors would lead to such successes. Why? Because they taught a particular way and others want(ed) to train and learn and were willing to put in the time and effort in order to develop the requisite KAJU skills. It evolved and they created their own particularly successful business model - a model, by the way, which should change with both ones particular organizational strategy as well as their business environment(s).

IMHO

Pat
Patrick "Kaponookalani" Campbell, Ph.D.
KAJUKENBO - Professor Kai Li - ETS / HKA
Kenpo - SGM Rick Alemany 
DZR Jujitsu - ETS / AJI
BJJ - ETS / USFBJJ / Master Joe Moreira
Combat Sambo - ETS / GCA / GM Alan New 
JKD / Kun Tao - ETS / IMB / G. Savelli
Royal Hawaiian Lua - ETS PA / Olohe Eli

Offline Ron Baker

  • BlackBelt
  • Brown Belt
  • ****
  • Posts: 637
Re: The Business of Kajukenbo
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2009, 02:12:17 PM »
The problem with a business model is that, once implemented, you become a servant of the model, rather than the art.
That's true ... to an extent.  A business model that's founded on a bottom line, profits-first basis, doesn't serve Kajukenbo.  And I can't think of too many Kaju folks who would embrace it.  Yet a business model that places a reasonable limit on growth, without deviation from Kaju standards -- while maintaining sound economic principles -- is good. 

Example: a grade school classroom with 35 students per teacher, is not a desirable learning environment.  A classroom with 15 students per teacher is an appropriate learning environment.  So, someone who wanted to be school teacher shouldn't be discouraged from entering that profession simply because there's only one perceived model for education.  There are several models; many of them good.

As far as expansion goes, I'd say that limited and narrow fore-thought produces a limited and narrow model.  Renting 4000 square feet of retail space, all but guarantees that an instructor will be focused on chasing contracts rather than teaching Kaju content.  But if he or she limits the size of their space, then they will limit the size of their classes and be able to teach Kaju without compromising it. 

« Last Edit: July 24, 2009, 02:13:53 PM by backfist »
Sigung (Shihan) Ron Baker
Kajukenbo 5280 MMA Foundation
Under GM Jason Groff
Ordonez Kajukenbo Ohana

Offline Ron Baker

  • BlackBelt
  • Brown Belt
  • ****
  • Posts: 637
Re: The Business of Kajukenbo
« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2009, 02:21:27 PM »
I should say this to be clear: I'm not suggesting that Kajukenbo become a commercial enterprise.  It's an only an option.  And it should probably only be an option for those with a good business head, and the discipline to "keep it real".
Sigung (Shihan) Ron Baker
Kajukenbo 5280 MMA Foundation
Under GM Jason Groff
Ordonez Kajukenbo Ohana

Offline kajudru

  • Yellow Belt
  • **
  • Posts: 86
  • Attack the attacker
    • Shreveport Martial Arts
Re: The Business of Kajukenbo
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2009, 10:13:50 AM »
Well said Danjo.

My 2 cents: If you are a good teacher, then the students will come and you may make a little bit of beer money as a result. One reason I love Kajukenbo is the non McDojo feel of most of the schools, although sadly I have come across some that would fall into the McDojo category. Kajukenbo has to be one of the largest martial arts that a non martial artist has not heard of and that is fine by me.

P.S. Sijo charged $2 a month for classes. I know this was back in the 50's, but I am sure that was still chump change. From this link: http://kajukenbo.com/cafe/index.php?topic=127

CN: So you made a good living teaching the martial arts?

EMPERADO: No, I've never made a living teaching karate. You see we always charged very low fees for our instruction and we taught at Y.M.C.A.s and recreation centers. At the first schools we only charged $2.00 a month. That didn't even pay for belts and certificates. I always worked full time until I had a heart attack in 1982
Sihing Jason Drury
KSDI Student under Sifu Bill Ross (Tony Lasit Branch)
Elite Combat Academy
http://www.shreveportmartialarts.com/
Shreveport, LA

"More Sweat In Training, Less Blood In Battle"

Offline Ron Baker

  • BlackBelt
  • Brown Belt
  • ****
  • Posts: 637
Re: The Business of Kajukenbo
« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2009, 01:29:50 PM »
The original post simply asked for people to share their good business ideas, NOT whether Kaju should be commercialized like the ATA.  Having a sound business model and wanting to make a living teaching martial arts, have nothing to do with each other.

If you teach Kaju, and you charge ten bucks a month ... like it or not, you're in business.   
Sigung (Shihan) Ron Baker
Kajukenbo 5280 MMA Foundation
Under GM Jason Groff
Ordonez Kajukenbo Ohana

Offline punisher73

  • Yellow Belt
  • **
  • Posts: 61
Re: The Business of Kajukenbo
« Reply #7 on: September 22, 2009, 12:43:38 PM »
It's a double edged sword.  You want the word to get out and your art to spread because of your belief in it.  The problem is that an art like Kajukenbo doesn't lend itself well to many people, it DOESN'T cater to the soccer mom crowd looking for a babysitter for a few hours a week.  Almost all of the successful commercial schools I know of or have heard of have large children's classes.  There is nothing wrong in an of itself teaching children, but you have to REALLY rework your curriculum to teach them.  So to spread the word, you have to change what it is you have such belief in, and then it isn't what you believe in anymore.

A couple of examples,

American Kenpo:  MANY of the top seniors complain about the quality of instructors when Ed Parker tried to spread kenpo to the masses, many people also complain that many schools are no better than a McDojo.

Shaolin Kempo Karate:  Villari USED to have rough and tumble schools that emphasized hard sparring and contact.  When he wanted to spread the art that changed and classes were toned down and now SKK is almost exclusively known as a McDojo art and people forget that it has alot of good stuff in there.

I would LOVE to see a Kajukenbo school in my area, but not at the expense of what I believe would be gained from it's study if it was changed to have a mass appeal.  Because Kajukenbo isn't so effective just because of it's techniques alone, it is also the training method employed to instill those techs and concepts.
Kevin A. Hirakis
SW Michigan

Offline kajukine2

  • Senior Black Belt
  • Yellow Belt
  • ***
  • Posts: 94
    • Estellermma.com
Re: The Business of Kajukenbo
« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2009, 01:53:02 AM »
I taught for free at a Boys/Girls Club for 15 yrs before opening a business, and let me tell you that was the best desision I ever made.

Since I had abduction and murder of a child in my family I started teaching kids, at first it was crazy me a new teacher, and students who didnt pay me.. kaju all the way, dont let the door hit you on the way out.
I never had more than 25 student at a time in all those years... great group.. sigung Eric and sifu Micky among them, but climbing polls in the driving rain and blaze of the sun was NO fun...

The last ten years as a business has been interesting, kids pay the rent, no doubt.
Its been a struggle to learn how to make a living without compromising, and sometimes I had to, but though the years I have found the parents WANT us to beat their A$$. so, we can teach real kaju and build them into warriors... I has been wonderful to see some of my kids that started ten years ago leaving for college, and see what they have grown into, no other profession other than teacher has that feature, and us to a much more higher level of satisfaction.

The secret to the longevity of my students is Ohana, never forget that is what makes us so different from any other art, that alone has kept my school active through these hard times, I have probably 2k a month in scholarships right now, but if you let them go they may not come back, but if you keep them close when times are better you dont have to chase them down, they are already there. on the floor with grateful parents who sell FOR you.
 I dont spend a dime on advertising, the only way to find us is to fall upon us or be refered.... works for us, make your parents your best sales staff... free labor.....

The next big push in the martial arts ever changing word is "Reality Based"  arts... hay right up our ally.... Kajukenbo is so diversified we can market along many lines.
Kajukenbo as a traditional art, as a sport combat art, or as a Defensive Tactics program, I have programs at different community centers in my area, and through those programs I have been able to increase enrollment at the Dojo.

As a professional martial arts instructor I have been able to have time for MY children, I never missed a field trip either of my children were ever on, I coached every team they played on, I was room mom and librarian for many years, I have helped raise OTHER peoples children, and make good solid citizens of our great nation, LEO's, Army Rangers, Educators, a young man escaped a abduction attempt using techniques he learned in our S.A.F.E.KIDS Program... so is being a professional martial arts instructor all its cracked up to be??? I say yes, I say do it if you are thinking about it, I say stick with it if you are currently teaching and having a hard time.. the more that know about kajukenbo, the more lives we save.....

Ron Esteller Life long student of GM James Juarez...1968-Present

Board Member KAA
Board of Advisors, Pacific Jujitsu Alliance. DZR JJ
Black shirt Pedoy Escrima Derobio under
GM Melcor Chavez
Black Belt instructor in CQC, Knife/Counter Knife, Impact Weapon Combatives  under Hock W. Hockheeim

Offline Ron Baker

  • BlackBelt
  • Brown Belt
  • ****
  • Posts: 637
Re: The Business of Kajukenbo
« Reply #9 on: September 23, 2009, 07:36:03 AM »
I taught for free at a Boys/Girls Club for 15 yrs before opening a business, and let me tell you that was the best desision I ever made.

Since I had abduction and murder of a child in my family I started teaching kids, at first it was crazy me a new teacher, and students who didnt pay me.. kaju all the way, dont let the door hit you on the way out.
I never had more than 25 student at a time in all those years... great group.. sigung Eric and sifu Micky among them, but climbing polls in the driving rain and blaze of the sun was NO fun...

The last ten years as a business has been interesting, kids pay the rent, no doubt.
Its been a struggle to learn how to make a living without compromising, and sometimes I had to, but though the years I have found the parents WANT us to beat their A$$. so, we can teach real kaju and build them into warriors... I has been wonderful to see some of my kids that started ten years ago leaving for college, and see what they have grown into, no other profession other than teacher has that feature, and us to a much more higher level of satisfaction.

The secret to the longevity of my students is Ohana, never forget that is what makes us so different from any other art, that alone has kept my school active through these hard times, I have probably 2k a month in scholarships right now, but if you let them go they may not come back, but if you keep them close when times are better you dont have to chase them down, they are already there. on the floor with grateful parents who sell FOR you.
 I dont spend a dime on advertising, the only way to find us is to fall upon us or be refered.... works for us, make your parents your best sales staff... free labor.....

The next big push in the martial arts ever changing word is "Reality Based"  arts... hay right up our ally.... Kajukenbo is so diversified we can market along many lines.
Kajukenbo as a traditional art, as a sport combat art, or as a Defensive Tactics program, I have programs at different community centers in my area, and through those programs I have been able to increase enrollment at the Dojo.

As a professional martial arts instructor I have been able to have time for MY children, I never missed a field trip either of my children were ever on, I coached every team they played on, I was room mom and librarian for many years, I have helped raise OTHER peoples children, and make good solid citizens of our great nation, LEO's, Army Rangers, Educators, a young man escaped a abduction attempt using techniques he learned in our S.A.F.E.KIDS Program... so is being a professional martial arts instructor all its cracked up to be??? I say yes, I say do it if you are thinking about it, I say stick with it if you are currently teaching and having a hard time.. the more that know about kajukenbo, the more lives we save.....


Thank you, thank you, thank you Professor.  You shared with me a prime example of what I've been asking for: good, sound business principles for a Kaju school. 
Sigung (Shihan) Ron Baker
Kajukenbo 5280 MMA Foundation
Under GM Jason Groff
Ordonez Kajukenbo Ohana

Offline Ron Baker

  • BlackBelt
  • Brown Belt
  • ****
  • Posts: 637
Re: The Business of Kajukenbo
« Reply #10 on: September 23, 2009, 07:40:57 AM »
It's a double edged sword.  You want the word to get out and your art to spread because of your belief in it.  The problem is that an art like Kajukenbo doesn't lend itself well to many people, it DOESN'T cater to the soccer mom crowd looking for a babysitter for a few hours a week.  Almost all of the successful commercial schools I know of or have heard of have large children's classes.  There is nothing wrong in an of itself teaching children, but you have to REALLY rework your curriculum to teach them.  So to spread the word, you have to change what it is you have such belief in, and then it isn't what you believe in anymore.

A couple of examples,

American Kenpo:  MANY of the top seniors complain about the quality of instructors when Ed Parker tried to spread kenpo to the masses, many people also complain that many schools are no better than a McDojo.

Shaolin Kempo Karate:  Villari USED to have rough and tumble schools that emphasized hard sparring and contact.  When he wanted to spread the art that changed and classes were toned down and now SKK is almost exclusively known as a McDojo art and people forget that it has alot of good stuff in there.

I would LOVE to see a Kajukenbo school in my area, but not at the expense of what I believe would be gained from it's study if it was changed to have a mass appeal.  Because Kajukenbo isn't so effective just because of it's techniques alone, it is also the training method employed to instill those techs and concepts.
Kevin, thanks.  But I'll say again what I've been saying all along: a good, sound business model does NOT mean mass production.  For instance, GM Emil Bautista has run the same school in Vallejo, CA for over 40 years.  THAT is an example of a good, sound business model. 
Sigung (Shihan) Ron Baker
Kajukenbo 5280 MMA Foundation
Under GM Jason Groff
Ordonez Kajukenbo Ohana

Offline punisher73

  • Yellow Belt
  • **
  • Posts: 61
Re: The Business of Kajukenbo
« Reply #11 on: September 23, 2009, 09:18:16 AM »
It's a double edged sword.  You want the word to get out and your art to spread because of your belief in it.  The problem is that an art like Kajukenbo doesn't lend itself well to many people, it DOESN'T cater to the soccer mom crowd looking for a babysitter for a few hours a week.  Almost all of the successful commercial schools I know of or have heard of have large children's classes.  There is nothing wrong in an of itself teaching children, but you have to REALLY rework your curriculum to teach them.  So to spread the word, you have to change what it is you have such belief in, and then it isn't what you believe in anymore.

A couple of examples,

American Kenpo:  MANY of the top seniors complain about the quality of instructors when Ed Parker tried to spread kenpo to the masses, many people also complain that many schools are no better than a McDojo.

Shaolin Kempo Karate:  Villari USED to have rough and tumble schools that emphasized hard sparring and contact.  When he wanted to spread the art that changed and classes were toned down and now SKK is almost exclusively known as a McDojo art and people forget that it has alot of good stuff in there.

I would LOVE to see a Kajukenbo school in my area, but not at the expense of what I believe would be gained from it's study if it was changed to have a mass appeal.  Because Kajukenbo isn't so effective just because of it's techniques alone, it is also the training method employed to instill those techs and concepts.
Kevin, thanks.  But I'll say again what I've been saying all along: a good, sound business model does NOT mean mass production.  For instance, GM Emil Bautista has run the same school in Vallejo, CA for over 40 years.  THAT is an example of a good, sound business model. 

I misread and was thinking along the lines of commercial success of Kajukenbo as a whole and not on an individual school to school basis.  You are right that you don't need to do that for individual schools but for Kajukenbo to have a mass commercial success it may have to.
Kevin A. Hirakis
SW Michigan

Offline KajuJKDFighter

  • Senior Moderator
  • Black Belt
  • *****
  • Posts: 3442
  • "Accept the things to which fate binds you"
    • Bono's Jeet Kune Do and Kajukenbo
Re: The Business of Kajukenbo
« Reply #12 on: September 23, 2009, 02:05:53 PM »
Good one Ronnie
GM John E Bono DC
9th Degree Grand Master Gaylord Method Kajukenbo
Full Instructor-Hartsell's Jeet Kune Do Grappling Assoc
Chief Instructor Bono's Jeet Kune Do/Kajukenbo
Champions aren't made in the gyms. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them a desire,a dream,a vision