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THE BUCKET LIST-Some Great Places to see!

Author Topic: THE BUCKET LIST-Some Great Places to see!  (Read 11594 times)

Offline envisiontj

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Re: Things to do and see before you die.
« Reply #15 on: January 15, 2009, 03:35:55 PM »
Brother Dean, yeah that sounds like a great idea, a great way to face fears and surpass mental blocks.

There are so many more things on my list, and so many have already been done.  I love the idea of this thread.  It is great to see what others are into and how their life is and a great place to get new ideas.
Sifu Trent Junker
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Under GM Gerry Scott

Offline Patrick Campbell

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Re: Things to do and see before you die.
« Reply #16 on: January 15, 2009, 06:54:46 PM »
We should rename this thread as, "THE BUCKET LIST"  ha,ha...


10 things you want to do before you die...

1)  Bring a life into this world (done)
2)  Find my soul mate.  (done)  Wife
3)  Train Kajukenbo with a living legend. (done) Too many to list.
4)  Serve my country. (done)  USN/USMC 2003-present
5)  Save a life.  (done)  too many to list
6)  Own a Harley (done)  89 HD Soft Tail custom
7)  Have a son.  (got 2)  Charles & Taylor
8)  Have a daughter (done) Mystique & Jade (RIP)
9)  Laugh until I cry (done) 
10)  Write a book, be on TV, or be in a magazine or book.  (done)  Fight Quest/Prof Bishops book & FMA Digest


PS
Thank you Prof. Bishop, GM Harper and Associate GM Bansuelo & GM Estalilla for the last one.   ;D


Im content...  Life is good!!!!






Amazing. I guess I still have alot of things I want to do.

Pat
Patrick "Kaponookalani" Campbell, Ph.D.
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Offline MARK GERRY

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THE BUCKET LIST
« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2009, 01:59:41 PM »
The Great Pyramids


For thousands of years, the largest structures on Earth were pyramids: first the Red Pyramid in the Dashur Necropolis and then the Great Pyramid of Khufu, the only one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World still remaining. The largest pyramid ever built, by volume, is the Great Pyramid of Cholula, in the Mexican state of Puebla. This pyramid is still being excavated. The Great Pyramid of Khafre is the oldest and only wonder of the world left.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2009, 12:37:25 AM by MARK GERRY »
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do

Offline MARK GERRY

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Re: THE BUCKET LIST
« Reply #18 on: January 18, 2009, 11:11:51 PM »
The Harding Icefield


The Harding Icefield can claim to cover over 300 square miles (483 km²) in its entirety (although, if one were to count its glaciers which descend from the icefield in all directions, the icefield measures in at over 1,100 square miles (1,771 km²) [1] The icefield spawns up to 40 glaciers, and of all types: hanging, tidewater, valley to name a few. Some of the more notable glaciers include the Tustumena Glacier, Exit Glacier, and McCarty Glacier. The Exit Glacier, however, is the most accessible of the glaciers being reached by a spur road off of the Seward Highway.

The icefield is also one of four remaining icefields in the United States and is the largest icefield contained entirely within the United States.[2]. The icefield itself receives over 400 inches of snow each year[3].
« Last Edit: January 19, 2009, 12:36:31 AM by MARK GERRY »
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do

Offline MARK GERRY

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Re: THE BUCKET LIST
« Reply #19 on: January 18, 2009, 11:28:51 PM »
Angel Falls

Angel Falls (indigenous name: Parakupa-vena or Kerepakupai merú) is the world's highest waterfall at 979 m (3,212 ft), with a clear drop of 807 m (2,647 ft). It is located in the Canaima National Park, in the Gran Sabana region of Bolivar State, Venezuela at [show location on an interactive map] 5°58′03″N 62°32′08″W / 5.9675, -62.53556Coordinates: [show location on an interactive map] 5°58′03″N 62°32′08″W / 5.9675, -62.53556 . The height of the falls is so great that before getting anywhere near the ground, the water is vaporized by the strong winds and turned into mist. The base of the falls feeds into the Kerep River (alternately known as the Rio Gauya) which flows into the Churun River, a tributary of the Carrao River. In the indigenous Pemon language Angel Falls is called Kerepakupai merú meaning "waterfall of the deepest place".
« Last Edit: January 19, 2009, 12:35:46 AM by MARK GERRY »
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do

Offline MARK GERRY

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Re: THE BUCKET LIST
« Reply #20 on: January 18, 2009, 11:55:05 PM »
The Amazon River

The Amazon River (Portuguese: Rio Amazonas; Spanish: Río Amazonas) of South America is the largest river in the world by volume, with a total river flow greater than the next top ten largest rivers flowing into the ocean combined. The Amazon, which has the largest drainage basin in the world, accounts for approximately one fifth of the world's total river flow. Because of its vast dimensions, it is sometimes called The River Sea. At no point is the Amazon crossed by bridges.[1] This is only partly because of its huge dimensions—in fact, for most of its length the Amazon is not so wide that a modern bridge could not span it—but more because, for most of its length, the river flows through tropical rainforest, where there are few roads and even fewer cities.

While the Amazon is clearly the largest river in the world by most measures, the current consensus within the geographic community holds that the Amazon is the second longest river, just slightly shorter than the Nile.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2009, 12:35:22 AM by MARK GERRY »
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do

Offline MARK GERRY

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Re: THE BUCKET LIST
« Reply #21 on: January 19, 2009, 12:24:31 AM »
The Great Barrier Reef

The Great Barrier Reef is the largest coral reef system in the world,[1][2] composed of over 2,900 individual reefs[3] and 900 islands stretching for 2,600 kilometres (1,600 mi) over an area of approximately 344,400 square kilometres (133,000 sq mi).[4][5] The reef is located in the Coral Sea, off the coast of Queensland in northeast Australia.
The Great Barrier Reef

The Great Barrier Reef can be seen from outer space and is the world's biggest single structure made by living organisms.[6] This reef structure is composed of and built by billions of tiny organisms, known as coral polyps.[7] The Great Barrier Reef supports a wide diversity of life, and was selected as a World Heritage Site in 1981.[1][2] CNN has labelled it one of the 7 natural wonders of the world.[8] The Queensland National Trust has named it a state icon of Queensland.[9]

A large part of the reef is protected by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, which helps to limit the impact of human use, such as overfishing and tourism. Other environmental pressures to the reef and its ecosystem include water quality from runoff, climate change accompanied by mass coral bleaching, and cyclic outbreaks of the crown-of-thorns starfish.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2009, 12:34:51 AM by MARK GERRY »
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do

Offline MARK GERRY

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Re: THE BUCKET LIST
« Reply #22 on: January 19, 2009, 12:33:36 AM »
Mount Everest

Mount Everest, also called Sagarmatha (Nepali: सगरमाथा meaning Head of the Sky) or Chomolungma, Qomolangma or Zhumulangma (in Tibetan: ཇོ་མོ་གླང་མ, in Chinese: 珠穆朗玛峰 Zhūmùlǎngmǎ Fēng) is the highest mountain on Earth, as measured by the height of its summit above sea level, which is 8,848 metres (29,029 ft). The mountain, which is part of the Himalaya range in High Asia, is located on the border between Sagarmatha Zone, Nepal, and Tibet, China.

In 1856, the Great Trigonometric Survey of India established the first published height of Everest at 29,002 ft (8,840 m), although at the time Everest was known as Peak XV. In 1865, Everest was given its official English name by the Royal Geographical Society upon recommendation of Andrew Waugh, the British Surveyor General of India at the time. Waugh was unable to propose an established local name because Nepal and Tibet were closed to foreigners at the time, although Chomolungma had been in common use by Tibetans for centuries.

The highest mountain in the world attracts climbers of all levels, from well experienced mountaineers to novice climbers willing to pay substantial sums to professional mountain guides to complete a successful climb. The mountain, while not posing substantial technical climbing difficulty on the standard route (other eight-thousanders such as K2 or Nanga Parbat are much more difficult), still has many inherent dangers such as altitude sickness, weather and wind. By the end of the 2007 climbing season, there had been 3,679 ascents to the summit by 2,436 individuals. Climbers are a significant source of tourist revenue for Nepal, whose government also requires all prospective climbers to obtain an expensive permit, costing up to US$25,000 per person.[4] Everest has claimed 210 lives, including eight who perished during a 1996 storm high on the mountain. Conditions are so difficult in the death zone that most corpses have been left where they fell, some of which are visible from standard climbing routes
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do

Offline MARK GERRY

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Re: THE BUCKET LIST
« Reply #23 on: January 30, 2009, 06:04:29 PM »
Kiribati, Micronesia


The world's most eastern point, Kiribati (formerly known as the Gilbert Islands) is an island nation found about 4,000 kilometers southwest of Hawaii in the Pacific Ocean. Straddling the equator, it comprises 33 islands (only 21 of which are inhabited), and is home to the world's largest protected marine reserve. Thought to be one of the last untouched coral archipelagos, it's about the size of California. With coconut trees galore (its main economy), white-sand beaches and crystal-clear lagoon waters, it's like a luxurious Sandals resort, only natural.

« Last Edit: February 08, 2009, 04:35:16 PM by MARK GERRY »
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do

Offline MARK GERRY

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Re: THE BUCKET LIST-Some Great Places to see!
« Reply #24 on: February 08, 2009, 04:33:34 PM »
Taupo, New Zealand


Mordor is more colorful than you'd think. While the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy featured the slopes of the perfect cinder cone Mt. Ngaurahoe as Mount Doom and its surrounding volcanic fields as the Black Land, much of the rest of New Zealand's thermal region sports colors more apropos to a bushel of gems. The Waikato River outside of Taupo flows turquoise through Huka Falls, and at Wai-O-Tapu, lakes come in colors like lime green and teal with an ochre fringe.

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do

Offline MARK GERRY

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Re: THE BUCKET LIST-Some Great Places to see!
« Reply #25 on: February 08, 2009, 04:39:12 PM »
Skeleton Coast, Namibia


In Namibia, there is a desert where the sands sing and ships go to die. Called "The Land God Made in Anger" by the Namibian bushmen, the Skeleton Coast is one of the most arid places on Earth, seeing less than half an inch of rain a year. The region is named for the whalebones that littered the shore in the whaling era, but still applies to the thousand-plus shipwrecks that litter the shore, foundered in fog and heavy surf. Still, its looming ochre dunes are among the most picturesque in the world, trod only by oryx, desert elephants and a few hardy travelers.
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do

Offline MARK GERRY

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Re: THE BUCKET LIST-Some Great Places to see!
« Reply #26 on: February 08, 2009, 04:48:14 PM »
Cappadocia, Turkey


Visit central Turkey, and you will believe in fairies -- or at least their dwellings. Cappadocia is a land of natural spires, called fairy chimneys by the Turks, formed by flimsy volcanic ash protected by capstones of basalt. Despite the name, the dwellings carved into the cliff- and spire-sides were built first by ancient peoples with Flintstone-like aesthetics, and later early Christians and then Byzantines, who constructed monasteries and churches complete with frescoes that can still be viewed today.


Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do

Offline MARK GERRY

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Re: THE BUCKET LIST-Some Great Places to see!
« Reply #27 on: February 08, 2009, 04:49:29 PM »
Tepui (Tabletop) Mountains, Venezuela


Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's "Lost World" actually exists. The book was inspired by a report about Venezuela's tepui mountains, massive tables of stone that rise thousands of feet from the jungle with almost sheer edges. The difficulty of reaching the plateaus and their distinct climate has over the millennia created unique flora and fauna found nowhere else in the world. Mount Roraima is the most commonly accessed of the tepui. Hire a guide in Paraitepui; the hike takes five days.

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do

Offline MARK GERRY

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Wonders of the World
« Reply #28 on: January 11, 2010, 11:57:16 PM »
OK................ITS 2010!!!,..................LETS GO............HERE ARE A FEW LIST OF PLACES TO SEE...THE "Wonders of the World"


Wonders of the World

Various lists of the Wonders of the World have been compiled over the ages to cataloger the most spectacular man-made constructions and natural things in the world.

The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World is the first known list of the most remarkable man-made creations of classical antiquity, and was based on guide-books popular among Hellenic sight-seers and only includes works located around the Mediterranean rim. The number seven was chosen because the Greeks believed it to be the representation of perfection and plenty.[1] Many similar lists have been made, including lists for the Medieval World and the Modern World.
Typically representative of the seven greatest wonders of the Medieval world are:[2][3][4][5]

Stonehenge
Colosseum
Catacombs of Kom el Shoqafa
Great Wall of China
Porcelain Tower of Nanjing
Hagia Sophia
Leaning Tower of Pisa



 
The Great Pyramid of Giza, the only wonder of the ancient world still in existence
The Colosseum in Rome
The Great Wall of China
Hagia Sophia
Taj Mahal
Golden Gate Bridge
Chichen Itza
Old City of Jerusalem
The Aurora Borealis or Northern Lights
Grand Canyon
The Great Barrier Reef
The London sewerage system's original Abbey Mills pumping station
Machu Picchu
The historian Herodotus (484?ca. 425 BCE), and the scholar Callimachus of Cyrene (ca. 305?240 BCE) at the Museum of Alexandria, made early lists of Seven wonders but their writings have not survived, except as references. The seven wonders included:

Great Pyramid of Giza
Hanging Gardens of Babylon
Statue of Zeus at Olympia
Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
Mausoleum of Maussollos at Halicarnassus
Colossus of Rhodes
Lighthouse of Alexandria
The earliest lists had the Ishtar Gate as the seventh wonder of the world instead of the Lighthouse of Alexandria.

The Greek category was not Wonders but "thaumata"(Greek: Θαύματα), which translates closer to "things to be seen". The list that we know today was compiled in the Middle Ages?by which time many of the sites were no longer in existence. Today, the only ancient world wonder that still exists is the Great Pyramid of Giza.

Wonders of the Medieval World
Many lists of wonders of the world are said to have existed during the Middle Ages, although it is unlikely that these lists originated at that time because the word medieval was not even invented until the Enlightenment-era, and the concept of a Middle Age did not become popular until the 16th century. Brewer's refers to them as "later list suggesting the lists were created after the Middle Ages.

Many of the structures on these lists were built much earlier than the Medieval Ages, but were well known.[3] These lists go by names such as Wonders of the Middle Ages (implying no specific limitation to seven), Seven Wonders of the Middle Ages, Medieval Mind and Architectural Wonders of the Middle Ages.



Travel wonders of the world

Travel writer Howard Hillman is one of many who have compiled lists of the top man-made[21] and natural[22] tourist travel wonders of the world:

Man-made travel wonders
Giza pyramid complex
Great Wall of China
Taj Mahal
Machu Picchu
Bali
Angkor Wat
Forbidden City
Bagan Temples and Pagodas
Karnak Temple
Teotihuac?n
Natural travel wonders
Serengeti Migration
Gal?pagos Islands
Grand Canyon
Antarctica
Iguazu Falls
Amazon Rainforest
Ngorongoro Crater
Great Barrier Reef
Victoria Falls
Bora Bora

« Last Edit: January 12, 2010, 12:08:32 AM by MARK GERRY »
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do

Offline MARK GERRY

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Re: THE BUCKET LIST-Some Great Places to see!
« Reply #29 on: February 21, 2010, 02:29:17 PM »
Stonehenge
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do