Author Topic: ESCRIMA TRAINING AND DRILLS  (Read 11410 times)

LOYALONEHK

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ESCRIMA TRAINING AND DRILLS
« on: September 07, 2006, 04:51:30 PM »
Escrima has been a hidden part of Kajukenbo for many years.  With the FMA being recognized more and more within Kajukenbo and MA in general, I personaly would like to hear from some of you.  What type of solo and partner drills do you do?  How are you applying stick work within your techniques, etc?

Can anyone elaborate on this quote from Ron Harris's article in April 1990's Inside Kung Fu Pg. 71:  "Prohibited from teaching for money, Emperado makes his few select students pay in pain."  Who has had the HONOR of training with Sijo and learned his some of his stick knowledge over the years, and what was it like? 

It states that Sijo learned some Escrima from (at the time) Sijos step father, Alfred Peralta.  "He added that Peralta also fought Floro Villabrille in a full-contact stickfighting match in Kauai, Hawaii.  As evidence, he says there is a scar across Floros face where Peralta struck him with his cane".  I would have loved to have been there for that match. :o

Respectfully,
Dean




Offline Jason Goldsmith

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Re: ESCRIMA TRAINING AND DRILLS
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2006, 05:22:33 PM »
In WHKD, escrima is a main-stay of the style.  In fact, as outlined in a recent Inside Kung Fu article (April 2005), GM Dacascos announced his development of the Filipino Combative Martial Arts (FCMA) an expression of WHKD and his personal development with the Filipino arts.

In direct answer to your question, we have club counters against escrima sticks (or any other blunt object) and knife counters that are part of requirements for rank and that are highly based on escrima.  Additionally, students are expected to gain a proficiency in various escrima drills, although for the past ~15 years the requirements have not mandated knowledge at any specified rank. 

Typical drills include 6-count, 8-count, sinowali (sp?), cinco taro ("regular," "reverse," and Doce Pares style), as well as basic knife and stick fighting techniques.  It is typically incorporated as much as possible given an instructor's experience in Escrima.  For me, I know what I outlined above plus a few more counters and drills that Sifu Al taught me , but many other instructors have a lot more experience and thus teach a lot more. 

a few of those other drills include:

-knife-on-knife fighting, where the defender is fed various strikes and cut-blocks and stabs back (same works for sticks).
-weapon-unarmed defense, where the defender is fed various strikes and must spontaneously neutralize the weapon (specific counters are often incorporated as well to provide an introduction).

Finally, in my class we line the training knives' cutting surfaces with colored chalk, so we can see where we could have gotten cut after the drill, but without risk of staining the clothes. 
Sifu Jason Goldsmith
4th Degree, Wun Hop Kuen Do Kung Fu
Under GM Al Dacascos
Instructor--WHKD
Chapel Hill/Durham NC
www.tkfmma.com

Vala Au

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Re: ESCRIMA TRAINING AND DRILLS
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2006, 07:30:17 PM »
Definitely part of the curriculum and required for promotion.

Purple - Single knife form, knife on knife drill, empty hand vs. knife drill, disarms, and knife sparring.

Blue - Single stick form, stick vs. stick drill, stick vs. knife drill, disarms, and stick sparring.

Green - Stick and knife form (Espada y daga), double knife form, drills, disarms, and sparring.

Brown - Double stick form, double stick vs double stick drill (Sinawali), Double stick vs Single stick drill, disarms and sparring.

Black - Long Stick (Tapado) form, long stick vs long stick drill, long stick vs double stick drill, and sparring.

At each level the student learns a weapon form, drills, disarms both with the weapon and empty handed against it, and has to
show sparring proficiency.  The stick disarms include armlock takedowns and chokes.  The sparring includes ground fighting as well.

Suffice to say a good chunk of the training is stick and knife work.

Offline sifutimg

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Re: ESCRIMA TRAINING AND DRILLS
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2006, 02:33:57 AM »
My first formal experience of training martial arts was largely around the stick and knife.  This has carried forward through the years.  Through this summer we have done alot with the stick.  We work many of the drills outlined here as well as some others.  Doing GM Al Dacascos's 6-count empty hand drill with a stick is quite fun and very revealing.  I believe the stick work should be an integral part of the training for two main reasons, the first is that Sijo practiced and it's simply a part of our art and I honor that.  The second is that the stick work really helps hand eye coordination making your hands faster.  Also extending your intention and really making the stick a part of your body and extension of your hand is fundamental practice when picking anything up and having to use it in the street.  In one of Ernesto Persas videos he states "The speed of the stick is the speed of the hands".  It's so true. 

Anyway that's some of what we do.

Peace,
Tim
Professor Tim Gagnier
Student of Great Grandmaster Charles Gaylord & Grandmaster Sid Lopez
Chief Instructor Pacific Wind Kajukenbo
Student Forever
Yamhill, Oregon

Offline rockatear

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Re: ESCRIMA TRAINING AND DRILLS
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2006, 10:27:04 AM »
I was thinking it would interesting to see a fight with escrima sticks vs. bo staff.  Anybody have experience with that and can talk about the advantages and/or disadvantages of the sticks over the staff?

Respectfully,
Shirley Phelps, blue blelt, Hand to Hand Kajukenbo Self-Defense Center, Oakland, CA, www.handtohandkajukenbo.com, Gaylord Method, Chief Head Instructors:  Sifus Jen Resnick and Sonya Richardson

LOYALONEHK

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Re: ESCRIMA TRAINING AND DRILLS
« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2006, 11:45:55 AM »
I was thinking it would interesting to see a fight with escrima sticks vs. bo staff.  Anybody have experience with that and can talk about the advantages and/or disadvantages of the sticks over the staff?

Respectfully,


http://www.dogbrothers.com/

DBMA have some good video footage or sticks vs other weapons and they do have staff vs sticks. 

Its a good site, check it out. 8)  See for your self.

My opinion, it depends on who is on the other end of the weapon.  I would be willing to take on most with sticks in my hand but I know if I was fighting Prof Harper and he had the bo staff I would certainly consider my options a bit more. ;D ;)

Dean


LOYALONEHK

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Re: ESCRIMA TRAINING AND DRILLS
« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2006, 11:59:28 AM »
In addition to the last post. 
It is good practice when getting used to stick fighting to have one person use the staff to attack you.  When done in a controlled sense (training not fighting) then the one with the escrima sticks can work at a range where they are not smashing the partners fingers all the time, and can also work semi-safely at the longer range while getting used to having one big stick comming at them.  When you step it up a bit then you can work on your closing speed and angles also.  Once you get inside on the person where we a Kajukenboans like to play then, look out.  The bo staff is more of a long range weapon but in the right hands will cause a lot of damage at any range.  (Although I have not seen anyone grapple with a staff?)

Dean ;)

Offline cirillo

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Re: ESCRIMA TRAINING AND DRILLS
« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2006, 04:04:57 PM »
As part of our requirements for each belt level I require proficiency in eskrima.  This is pretty standard among WHKD instructors.  In my classes we train Doce Pares, Modern Arnis and Derobio styles.  As part of my teaching in WHKD, we work with the FCMA as GM Dacascos' has outlined, but we do it in the context of the other eskrima systems I have trained in.  We do eskrima-specific drills, but we also do all of our WHKD drills, self-defense techniques and forms with both one and two sticks, one stick one knife, two knives, etc... most of these turn out to be very useful excercises.

As to the question regarding Bo vs. Eskrima sticks, it is tough to say, assuming that the practitioners were equally skilled in their weapon (big assumption), I would imagine that the longer weapon would have an advantage in some instances and not others.  A skilled bo user, should be able to keep the stick user outside while causing damage, if there is space available.  Obviously, this would depend on the situation.  In the street, the bo would often be too long to be effective, since much street is close-in fighting.  In a wide-open space though, the bo would probably have an advantage.  Just my opinion.

In class, we do sparring drills with each of these weapons, but the problem is that the users never seem to be at the same skill level.  It still usually comes down to the user, not the weapon. 8)
Sifu Jeffrey D. Cirillo,  6th Degree Black belt in Wun Hop Kuen Do under GM Al Dacascos and 3rd Degree in FaChuan (Blossom Fist) under Sifu Bill Owens with over 35 years experience in the martial arts.
College Station, TX

TimothyVargas

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Re: ESCRIMA TRAINING AND DRILLS
« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2006, 05:49:51 PM »
Escrima has been a hidden part of Kajukenbo for many years.  With the FMA being recognized more and more within Kajukenbo and MA in general, I personaly would like to hear from some of you.  What type of solo and partner drills do you do?  How are you applying stick work within your techniques, etc?

Respectfully,
Dean





Sifu Dean,

I use a stack of tires for my solo hitting drills.  Its nice to twirl and hit the air, but nothing like good hard hitting when you are not able to hit a live opponent.  If you dont have a stack of tires a heavy bag will work.   I generally will work in 60 second drills, since the WEKAF rounds are 60 seconds with 30 second rests.  First I warm up with using one strike at a time for the 60 seconds, each hand, then move on to a more freestyle hitting (combo stick strikes also using the LIVE HAND as a check every 2 to 3 strikes).  Move on to two sticks, and continue to time the drills.   Eventually you wont need to time them, the goal is to surpass the times tournaments use since in a street situation there is no one there keeping time.

This is just a part of my solo drill routine.  Hopefully others will post some other good ideas.

We do many two man drills, but too many to list, plus I tend to be more of a hands-on type and is difficult for me to explain in writing  :-\

Timothy

TimothyVargas

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Re: ESCRIMA TRAINING AND DRILLS
« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2006, 06:28:23 PM »
I forgot to mention that I do use heavier sticks and dress in full WEKAF gear while training.

Offline rockatear

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Re: ESCRIMA TRAINING AND DRILLS
« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2006, 01:32:00 PM »
Thanks everybody for your response to my question re sticks vs. staff.  I liked the video Sifu Dean and am thinking of buying a dvd/video on escrima fighting and techniques.  Any recommendations would be appreciated.  Sifu Timonthy, I have some equipment to put together which is called the interactive workout partner and am looking forward to trying some of the exercises you mentioned you do with the tires.

I'm quite new to escrima sticks.  Learning weapon forms is mostly elective in our school although learning to defend against the weapons is a requirement.  I've taken a few classes in arnis and a workshop.  In defending, one of things I'm learning is that disarment of sticks is sometimes similar to grappling techniques in terms of arm and elbow locks and twisting of the body.  I have learned the 6-count, 12-count and just this past Friday learned a short form.  Naturally, I brought up my question about staff vs. sticks.  Sifu Ann teaches our arnis class and in the discussion with everybody's input, it was the consensus was that if you get in close and given that the fighters are of equal caliber and skill, then the stick has the advantage and at a distance the staff has the advantage.  But I haven't talked to our Sifu Sonya who teaches and loves working with the staff and I think she might have another response regardless of distance. ;)

In terms of training and choices, I prefer the sword even though haven't had much training with it and how often does one have a sword with them or available during a fight?  But I would grab something close to a stick over a knife or a stick in length similar to a staff if I were in a situation where I had choices.

Having said that, what are people's weapons of choice?

with respect,
Shirley Phelps, blue blelt, Hand to Hand Kajukenbo Self-Defense Center, Oakland, CA, www.handtohandkajukenbo.com, Gaylord Method, Chief Head Instructors:  Sifus Jen Resnick and Sonya Richardson

LOYALONEHK

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Re: ESCRIMA TRAINING AND DRILLS
« Reply #11 on: September 10, 2006, 02:23:17 PM »
It would be nice if I could carry a .45 all the time but thats not going to happen.  I do have a close friend who takes his SKS on road trips.  (not recommended) ;)
I ride with him ::)

Off hand I always have a few knives at arms reach (sticks and knives are my favorite).  Also thinking in line with weapons of oportunity;  my car antenna is only hand tight so that it can be removed easily and used in the same fashion as the escrima stick.  In day to day adventures take a  look around, really look and ask yourself what could I make into a weapon if needed.  A couple things to get you started;  picture or certificates on the wall, break the glass and wrap and piece of fabric around one end to make a quick sharp weapon.  Broom handles, paper cutter (handle makes a nice machette).  Im not going to steal all the thunder...  What can you think of around the work place, car or home that can be used as a weapon of opportunity.  How often do you employ these items in your training.  This is the 21 Century and we should adjust accordingly.

Dean

TimothyVargas

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Re: ESCRIMA TRAINING AND DRILLS
« Reply #12 on: September 11, 2006, 11:14:02 PM »
I have some equipment to put together which is called the interactive workout partner and am looking forward to trying some of the exercises you mentioned you do with the tires.



Shirley,

I have never heard of the interactive workout partner, does it move? what is it made out of?  If you have a picture of it could you post it?  Thank you.   I am trying to build a contraption that I could dress in an escrima suit with helmet,etc., looking for some good ideas.

Timothy

Offline slowkick

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Re: ESCRIMA TRAINING AND DRILLS
« Reply #13 on: September 11, 2006, 11:59:36 PM »
For some reason I’ve always been attracted to the art of stick fighting.  I had an opportunity to train for a brief period in the late 80’s with Augung(sp) Tony Ramos.  Since then I wanted to get back into it but never found a style complimentary to Kajukenbo until I moved to Stockton, ca.  I’ve chosen to embark on training in Serrda Escrima.  My instructor is Guru Darren Tibon in Stockton Calif.  I started training in late February and find the techniques are very complimentary to Kaju.
Sifu Anthony Wade
Kajukenbo - Gaylord Method
5th Degree BB
Wade's Martial Arts

Offline rockatear

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Re: ESCRIMA TRAINING AND DRILLS
« Reply #14 on: September 12, 2006, 01:15:44 AM »
Sifu Timothy,

I'll get up a pic as soon as possible of the box since it still needs to be put together.  I picked it up at Big 5 on sale for about $99.  Usually I put these things together but since I haven't figured where to put it, it's still in the box.  But it sounds like it might meet your needs.  It bounces back when you punch it and how much it bounces back depends on the force used or so it says.

with respect,
Shirley Phelps, blue blelt, Hand to Hand Kajukenbo Self-Defense Center, Oakland, CA, www.handtohandkajukenbo.com, Gaylord Method, Chief Head Instructors:  Sifus Jen Resnick and Sonya Richardson